Avibird

Back 2006, Roflight did develop his first artificial bird based on flapping flight (ornithopter). These models were featured with flexible profiled wings to understand more about flapping flight. With the required falconry- tech backgrounds, we discovered that bird of prey models provoke “scare” reactions to prey / pest birds and trigger swarms into discourage. Roflight has come up with a new innovation: the Avibird (animatronic). Avibirds are "bird- look alike"(radio controlled) flown model aircrafts and come in adult plumage (grey/blue), feather printed.

There were many successful tests on airports to reduce pest birds. Artificial birds can elicit the same responses to pest birds as that of a natural bird of prey. 

The first artificial bird models were less safe, because they were flown on sight at the time. By flying on sight, no desired distances can be achieved and estimated so that the pest birds could not be “pin point” attacked. In order to ensure proper operation, the attack is essential to reach the stage of “effective" bird control.

 


The current models are equipped with an onboard camera and are connected through video with the pilot. The system is very safe, because they controlled from first person view in order to avoid obstacles. The scope of application has increased sharply. The Roflight models can also stay longer in the air. For safety reasons, the artificial birds have dropped weight.

 

Peregrine falcon

The Avibird is the result of a swirling development over the last 12 years. The ultimate outcome of using practical scientific researches. The model peregrine falcon for example is silently, can deter small to medium sized pest birds and even pursuit flocks of starlings because she is extremely maneuverable. Stoops enable even more realistic flights. Lightweight materials, a streamlined organic body and aesthetically-shaped wings. Flights performed from the perspective of the falcon make it possible to achieve pin point attacks. She can fly for 20 minutes up to 6bft wind speed. As the falcon weighs just 245 grams she forms no danger for humans, vehicles or planes during a possible crash. Working area amounts about 6 km2.

People do not take attention to Avibirds as they produce almost no audible sound. They are not invisible, of course, but indistinguishable from real birds. Avibirds do not distract humans (e.g. operators of cars, bikes, machines and especially pilots of airplanes) because they resemble real birds. 

 

Goshawk


Roflight artificial birds can only be controlled by a qualified operator with a lot of flight experiences with rc model aircrafts, combined with the knowledge and skills of raptors / hunting birds.
This is necessary to understand the interaction between prey and predator to prevent habituation.
During flight, the artificial bird imitates the real bird of prey by moving and behaving exactly like the real one.
Flapping can be alternated by gliding and natural hunting attacks can be precisely simulated.
Only in the Netherlands, the Roflight animatronics (Avibirds) are successfully deployed at airports of the Dutch Royal Air Force. By now, artificial birds cannot be operated at any time. For example, during rainfall, poor sight, frost or strong wind (over 6Bft). Also, they should not fly nearby buildings or above people.

 


Roflight is also a licensed falconer and keeps living birds of prey (goshawks) for bird control and those can be used when the Avibirds cannot perform their work.

 

Back 2006, Roflight did develop his first artificial bird based on flapping flight (ornithopter). These models were featured with flexible profiled wings to understand more about flapping flight. With the required falconry- tech backgrounds, we discovered that bird of prey models provoke “scare” reactions to prey / pest birds and trigger swarms into discourage. Roflight has come up with a new innovation: the Avibird (animatronic). Avibirds are "bird- look alike"(radio controlled) flown model aircrafts and come in adult plumage (grey/blue), feather printed.

There were many successful tests on airports to reduce pest birds. Artificial birds can elicit the same responses to pest birds as that of a natural bird of prey. 

The first artificial bird models were less safe, because they were flown on sight at the time. By flying on sight, no desired distances can be achieved and estimated so that the pest birds could not be “pin point” attacked. In order to ensure proper operation, the attack is essential to reach the stage of “effective" bird control.

 


The current models are equipped with an onboard camera and are connected through video with the pilot. The system is very safe, because they controlled from first person view in order to avoid obstacles. The scope of application has increased sharply. The Roflight models can also stay longer in the air. For safety reasons, the artificial birds have dropped weight.

 

Peregrine falcon

The Avibird is the result of a swirling development over the last 12 years. The ultimate outcome of using practical scientific researches. The model peregrine falcon for example is silently, can deter small to medium sized pest birds and even pursuit flocks of starlings because she is extremely maneuverable. Stoops enable even more realistic flights. Lightweight materials, a streamlined organic body and aesthetically-shaped wings. Flights performed from the perspective of the falcon make it possible to achieve pin point attacks. She can fly for 20 minutes up to 6bft wind speed. As the falcon weighs just 245 grams she forms no danger for humans, vehicles or planes during a possible crash. Working area amounts about 6 km2.

People do not take attention to Avibirds as they produce almost no audible sound. They are not invisible, of course, but indistinguishable from real birds. Avibirds do not distract humans (e.g. operators of cars, bikes, machines and especially pilots of airplanes) because they resemble real birds. 

 

Goshawk


Roflight artificial birds can only be controlled by a qualified operator with a lot of flight experiences with rc model aircrafts, combined with the knowledge and skills of raptors / hunting birds.
This is necessary to understand the interaction between prey and predator to prevent habituation.
During flight, the artificial bird imitates the real bird of prey by moving and behaving exactly like the real one.
Flapping can be alternated by gliding and natural hunting attacks can be precisely simulated.
Only in the Netherlands, the Roflight animatronics (Avibirds) are successfully deployed at airports of the Dutch Royal Air Force. By now, artificial birds cannot be operated at any time. For example, during rainfall, poor sight, frost or strong wind (over 6Bft). Also, they should not fly nearby buildings or above people.

 


Roflight is also a licensed falconer and keeps living birds of prey (goshawks) for bird control and those can be used when the Avibirds cannot perform their work.