Avibird

In 2006, the first artificial bird was developed and realized based on flapping flight (ornithopter).
Initially, the first models still had aircraft-like features.
Over the years, the models have been developed into scaled-up birds (Avibirds).
With the required falconry- tech backgrounds, flapping bird models provoke “scare” reactions to prey / pest birds and trigger swarms into discourage.
There were many successful tests on airports to reduce pest birds. Artificial birds can elicit the same responses to pest birds as that of a natural bird of prey.
The first artificial bird models were less safe, because they were flown on sight at the time.
By flying on sight, no desired distances can be achieved and estimated so that the pest birds could not be “pin point” attacked.
In order to ensure proper operation, the attack is essential and we did not reach the stage of “effective" bird control.


The current models are equipped with an onboard camera and are connected through video with the pilot.
The model is flown from the bird’s perspective so that targeted attacks are made possible.
The system is very safe, because they controlled from first person view in order to avoid obstacles.
The scope of application has increased sharply. The Roflight models can also stay longer in the air.
For safety reasons, the artificial birds have dropped weight.
A model goshawk for example, has a weight around half a kilo and can fly for 30 minutes.


Roflight artificial birds can only be controlled by a qualified operator with a lot of radio flight experiences combined with the knowledge and skills of raptors / hunting birds.
This is necessary to understand the interaction between prey and predator to prevent habituation.
During flight, the artificial bird imitates the real bird of prey by moving and behaving exactly like the real one.
Flapping is alternated by gliding and natural hunting attacks can be precisely simulated.
Only in the Netherlands, the Roflight animatronics (Avibirds) are successfully deployed at airports of the Dutch Royal Air Force.
By now, artificial birds cannot be operated at any time.
For example, during rainfall, poor sight, frost or strong wind (over 6Bft). Also, they should not fly nearby buildings or above people.


Roflight is also a licensed falconer and keeps living birds of prey (goshawks) for bird control and those can be used when the Avibirds cannot perform their work.

In 2006, the first artificial bird was developed and realized based on flapping flight (ornithopter).
Initially, the first models still had aircraft-like features.
Over the years, the models have been developed into scaled-up birds (Avibirds).
With the required falconry- tech backgrounds, flapping bird models provoke “scare” reactions to prey / pest birds and trigger swarms into discourage.
There were many successful tests on airports to reduce pest birds. Artificial birds can elicit the same responses to pest birds as that of a natural bird of prey.
The first artificial bird models were less safe, because they were flown on sight at the time.
By flying on sight, no desired distances can be achieved and estimated so that the pest birds could not be “pin point” attacked.
In order to ensure proper operation, the attack is essential and we did not reach the stage of “effective" bird control.


The current models are equipped with an onboard camera and are connected through video with the pilot.
The model is flown from the bird’s perspective so that targeted attacks are made possible.
The system is very safe, because they controlled from first person view in order to avoid obstacles.
The scope of application has increased sharply. The Roflight models can also stay longer in the air.
For safety reasons, the artificial birds have dropped weight.
A model goshawk for example, has a weight around half a kilo and can fly for 30 minutes.


Roflight artificial birds can only be controlled by a qualified operator with a lot of radio flight experiences combined with the knowledge and skills of raptors / hunting birds.
This is necessary to understand the interaction between prey and predator to prevent habituation.
During flight, the artificial bird imitates the real bird of prey by moving and behaving exactly like the real one.
Flapping is alternated by gliding and natural hunting attacks can be precisely simulated.
Only in the Netherlands, the Roflight animatronics (Avibirds) are successfully deployed at airports of the Dutch Royal Air Force.
By now, artificial birds cannot be operated at any time.
For example, during rainfall, poor sight, frost or strong wind (over 6Bft). Also, they should not fly nearby buildings or above people.


Roflight is also a licensed falconer and keeps living birds of prey (goshawks) for bird control and those can be used when the Avibirds cannot perform their work.